Getting Started: Preparing for the world of entrepreneurial adventure (Rejection)

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Published by CPA Canada in CareerVision

Chances are, you’ve had some real success in your life thus far.  Perhaps, you’ve graduated with a business degree, obtained a professional designation, won a job or two, and maybe even received some awards or honours along the way.  Although you might have experienced some disappointments, they tend to pale in comparison to the accomplishments that are well worth celebrating.

As you progress in your career, the odds are that you might experience a setback or two unlike anything you’ve encountered thus far.  As the stakes get higher, the likelihood of success can get proportionately smaller, and what keeps us trying is the realization that the potential rewards are often greater.  Having said that, in the corporate world, jobs can be like buses, with another one coming along at any moment.  If you miss the first one, sit tight, as another opportunity isn’t far away.  There is a certain kind of comfort in this.

Working with a start up company can be quite different in this regard, and it’s important to understand the implications if you’re considering making the switch from a corporate job.  In this series, our focus is on understanding the significant differences between a startup environment and the corporate world so that you can put a greater emphasis on developing some of the skills that will serve you well in advance of when they’re actually needed.   So far, we’ve considered the implications of risk, the ever expanding job description, and money.  Let’s talk about rejection.

Why it Matters

If you’ve met someone who works with a startup company, they can probably tell you lots about the upside; the excitement, thrill of doing something new, and the opportunity to “chart your own course” (they will soon learn otherwise!).  What they probably don’t talk much about are the odds of getting to the point of real success, which can be startlingly bleak.

With an abundance of new ventures launching wherever you look, the reality is they are challenged to find the necessary resources, customers, and capital to be successful.  In a world where demand far exceeds supply, many upstarts don’t last very long.  This reality is particularly true in the case of seeking the necessary capital to expand products, market effectively, and support growth.  Many entrepreneurs consider this to be the easy part, as who wouldn’t want to support their venture?  As the months go by, it becomes clear that just getting an investor meeting is difficult, much less making a pitch and getting funded.

In reality, the odds are stacked against startup companies.  Chances are that your venture will be rejected again and again; by potential customers, investors, and partners.  Those that work with startup companies, regardless of their level of success in life thus far, are likely to face rejection in a way that they never have before.  This can be disheartening, as well as quite a shock to the system.

Get Started

Although no one likes to spend time thinking about the downside, doing so is a good way to strategize to get to a better place.  This includes planning to face rejection and how to rise above it:

  • Develop sound problem solving skills: Those who find resilience in difficult times tend to have an ability to think creatively and solve problems.  As simple as it sounds, many people just aren’t very resourceful and lack the ability to determine what to do next.  Practice problem solving by approaching situations with a Plan B, Plan C, and even a Plan D.  Make it a “game” for yourself to strategize how you might get over hurdles, even in situations where they don’t actually occur.
  • Adopt a flexible mindset: Those who last the longest during difficult times perhaps have the greatest ability to be flexible, in terms of adapting to circumstances that are different than what was expected.  If funding isn’t received when anticipated, or turns out to be less than planned, surviving the setback can be all about how flexible a company can be.
  • Learn about early stage financing: Since financing is so integral to success and so elusive at the start up stage, it’s an important area to learn about, sooner rather than later.  Understanding how this niche area works and what investors look for can help you to be better prepared to respond to challenging situations.
  • Have an outlet for countering setbacks: Rejection and setbacks are stressful, and having a coping mechanism for challenges that are unlike anything previously experienced is important in order to keep going.  Find what works for you, be it creative interests, sports, exercise, or meditation and practice on a regular basis.  The startup world is truly a marathon and it’s important to develop longevity.

Preparation won’t end rejection, but it might help to make it less frequent.  It will also put you in a better position to withstand the many setbacks that will come and find the ingenuity and wherewithal to keep going.  The entrepreneurial world isn’t like where you’ve been.  You’ve got to train for it.

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Jenifer Bartman

Business Advisor| Speaker| Published Author| CBC News Network Weekend Business Panel| Former Venture Capital Executive
Jenifer Bartman
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